April 20, 1961: Harold Graham made the first untethered flight in a rocket belt near Niagara Falls, New York. In the words of contractor Bell Aerospace: “The feasibility of man’s free and controlled flight with a rocket belt has been adequately demonstrated. Now this new dimension in mobility may be selected for practical applications, and through engineering development the rocket belt will emerge as a practical and useful device.” (Please note: The gif is sourced from a later demo flight at the Pentagon.)
(CBS News)

April 20, 1961: Harold Graham made the first untethered flight in a rocket belt near Niagara Falls, New York. In the words of contractor Bell Aerospace: “The feasibility of man’s free and controlled flight with a rocket belt has been adequately demonstrated. Now this new dimension in mobility may be selected for practical applications, and through engineering development the rocket belt will emerge as a practical and useful device.” (Please note: The gif is sourced from a later demo flight at the Pentagon.)

(CBS News)

Ancient Egyptian gods on vintage cigarette cards. Ancient and vintage!

(New York Public Library)

asker

Anonymous asked: Just so you know, Neil Degrasse Tyson is not the nice person he portrays himself to be. He sneaked into my house and stole my Easter candy, then said that if I told anyone nobody would believe me! He is not someone to be trusted or admired.

You know who told me there was no Easter bunny? Carl Sagan.

Then he proceeded to give me a wedgie.

Neil deGrasse Tyson in groovy space T-shirt while doing post-grad work at the University of Texas, where he would receive a Master of Arts in astronomy in 1983.

Neil deGrasse Tyson in groovy space T-shirt while doing post-grad work at the University of Texas, where he would receive a Master of Arts in astronomy in 1983.

The Apollo 10 command module in orbit around the Moon, 1969. (State Archives of Florida)

The Apollo 10 command module in orbit around the Moon, 1969. (State Archives of Florida)

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

“Marine Corps glider in flight out of Parris Island, South Carolina, in May of 1942.”
(LoC)

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

Marine Corps glider in flight out of Parris Island, South Carolina, in May of 1942.”

(LoC)

"Time is itself an element."

—Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Proverbs in Prose, 1819

Apollo 16 astronauts John Young and Charlie Duke train in the earthly version of the lunar rover in Taos, New Mexico, 9-10 September 1971. (NASA)

Apollo 16 astronauts John Young and Charlie Duke train in the earthly version of the lunar rover in Taos, New Mexico, 9-10 September 1971. (NASA)

Behold the future of orbital life, circa 1989, in Adventure on Space Station Freedom, created by Mandred “Dutch” von Ehrenfried, art by Mike Roy, courtesy of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Behold the future of orbital life, circa 1989, in Adventure on Space Station Freedom, created by Mandred “Dutch” von Ehrenfried, art by Mike Roy, courtesy of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Peter McIntyre, Tank battle on Belhamed, 13 March 1942. (Archives New Zealand)

Peter McIntyre, Tank battle on Belhamed, 13 March 1942. (Archives New Zealand)

A detail from the comic Science of Life: Physiology Research in Action, 1997, art by Mike Roy, published by NASA and the American Physiological Association. (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)

A detail from the comic Science of Life: Physiology Research in Action, 1997, art by Mike Roy, published by NASA and the American Physiological Association. (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)

"Pluto was once considered a planet on its own, but whether to include it or not is more of a problem of semantic definition than physics." —Phil Plait

"Pluto was once considered a planet on its own, but whether to include it or not is more of a problem of semantic definition than physics."Phil Plait

singlemanmedia:

humanoidhistory:

1992 NASA illustration of a moon base control room made of lunar concrete: “One use of concrete made primarily from lunar resources is seen in this cutaway sketch of a control room at a lunar base. Together with a blanket of lunar regolith, concrete would provide excellent shielding from the cosmic rays and solar flares that would be a serious hazard at a lunar base designed for long-term habitation.” (NASA, Johnson Space Center)

With the advancement of 3D printers we might soon be able to transfer “3D printing factories” to the Moon and have a test run at it.
Hopefully Mars’s soil will prove just as viable. 

Yes, I remember reading about that somewhere in recent months. I also remember years ago when a friend, about to head off to study at MIT, was telling me about 3D printing. It sounded like something out of Star Trek. I couldn’t quite wrap my brain around it. And now, we hear about it all the time. People are using 3D printers to make clothes, medical devices, musical instruments — even guns and, um, “adult products.” Heck, NASA is printing pizza!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISXqC-YPnpc

singlemanmedia:

humanoidhistory:

1992 NASA illustration of a moon base control room made of lunar concrete: “One use of concrete made primarily from lunar resources is seen in this cutaway sketch of a control room at a lunar base. Together with a blanket of lunar regolith, concrete would provide excellent shielding from the cosmic rays and solar flares that would be a serious hazard at a lunar base designed for long-term habitation.” (NASA, Johnson Space Center)

With the advancement of 3D printers we might soon be able to transfer “3D printing factories” to the Moon and have a test run at it.

Hopefully Mars’s soil will prove just as viable. 

Yes, I remember reading about that somewhere in recent months. I also remember years ago when a friend, about to head off to study at MIT, was telling me about 3D printing. It sounded like something out of Star Trek. I couldn’t quite wrap my brain around it. And now, we hear about it all the time. People are using 3D printers to make clothes, medical devices, musical instruments — even guns and, um, “adult products.” Heck, NASA is printing pizza!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISXqC-YPnpc

The Eagle Nebula, aka Messier 16, aka M16, aka NGC 6611, aka the Star Queen Nebula. (NASA)

The Eagle Nebula, aka Messier 16, aka M16, aka NGC 6611, aka the Star Queen Nebula. (NASA)

Mission control during the Gemini 5 mission, Houston, Texas, August 1965.
(NASA)

Mission control during the Gemini 5 mission, Houston, Texas, August 1965.

(NASA)